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Arjun Meghwal presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia

 Arjun Meghwal presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia


Arjun Meghwal, a Google’s India-born engineer who holds an MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington, recently presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia. The relics are said to be those of the founder of the Kapilvastu monastery, Siddhartha Gautama.


Arjun Meghwal presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia


Arjun Meghwal, a Punjabi singer who has achieved prominence in India and overseas, was presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia at a function here on Saturday. The relics, believed to be those of the 11th century mystic and poet Kapilvastu Bodhisattva, had been flown in from Ulan Bator on an Air India flight. Kapilvastu is one of the important pilgrimage centres for Buddhists. Arjun Meghwal said he was honoured to receive the relics, adding that he was looking forward to performing with them in some upcoming concerts.


The Relics of Kapilvastu


The holy Kapilvastu relics, brought back from Mongolia, were presented to Arjun Meghwal. The relics, which date back to the 9th century, are said to have miraculous powers.


The Journey to Bring the Relics Home


On October 26, 2014, a delegation of Arjun Meghwal, President and CEO of the India-based NGO Sulabh International, and his wife Radha welcomed the return of Kapilvastu relics from Mongolia. The relics were brought back by Sulabh International's partner organization in Mongolia, the Social Welfare Society.


Arjun Meghwal said that this was an important milestone in the NGO's efforts to promote social welfare and improve the lives of people in rural areas. "The relics have tremendous spiritual power and can help to motivate people to work for the betterment of their communities," he said.


The relics, which include a tooth relic of Lord Kapilvastu, were found during Sulabh International's annual outreach program to HIV/AIDS patients and other vulnerable groups living with HIV/AIDS in remote areas of Mongolia. The relic-bearing team spent months traveling through difficult terrain to bring them home.


"This is an incredible moment for our organization and for Arjun Meghwal personally," said Radha. "He has dedicated his life to working for the benefit of society, and we are immensely grateful that he has been able to bring


Arjun Meghwal Receives the Holy Kapilvastu Relics


On September 30, 2018, Arjun Meghwal was presented with the holy Kapilvastu relics brought back from Mongolia. The relics were brought back by an Indian emissary, Kumud Mishra, who traveled to Mongolia in February this year to secure them. Kapilvastu is a small town in East Nepal that is home to one of the holiest Buddhist pilgrimage sites - the Kapilvastu Temple. The temple is also home to a number of relics, including those of the Buddha's cousin and disciple, Ananda. Arjun Meghwal is the first Indian Hindu to be given these relics.


The Kapilvastu Temple is one of the most important Buddhist pilgrimage sites in Nepal and is visited by thousands of people every year. The relics are said to have healing powers and are believed to be able to cure diseases and afflictions.


The Reactions to Arjun Meghwal’s Acceptance of the Holy Kapilvastu Relics


The holy Kapilvastu relics that Arjun Meghwal accepted have sparked a lot of reactions online. Some people are happy that he has finally accepted the relics and others are disappointed that he did not get them in a more official way.


What the Holy Kapilvastu Relics Mean for the Future of Buddhism


The Kapilvastu relics, which were brought back from Mongolia last year, are a major symbol of hope for the future of Buddhism. Arjun Meghwal, founder and president of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI), spoke about this at a press conference on Monday. The relics, including a tooth relic and robe fragment, were discovered in 2004 near the city of Ulaanbaatar. According to Meghwal, they are significant because they "represent an important link in the transmission of Buddhism from one generation to the next." He believes that they will help to revitalize Buddhism in both East and West and promote world peace.

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